Candies Eaten Around the World

Posted on:

Candies Eaten Around the World

 

Perhaps you enjoy a traditional box of chocolates, or maybe you go crazy for the super sour treats that make your lips pucker. Whether you prefer chocolate, nuts, fruits or something else altogether, every one of us has a favorite candy — you know, the candy you dream of having all to yourself, buffet-style.

Peanut butter cups, gummy bears, chocolate bars — you know them all very well. Well, you at least know about the candies that have become America’s favorites, but what about the rest of the world?

The truth is, America is just a small part of the world’s candy population. Head up north, across the pond or around the globe, and you’ll discover candy from other countries you never knew existed. Part of the reason sweets from different countries are so fun to explore is because of their stories — who first created them? Why were they created? Each candy from around the world has its own story that makes it taste just a little bit sweeter.

Since we have a soft spot for sweet treats, we’ve gathered a list of 21 of our favorites candies from around the world to share with you.

1. Maple Taffy — Canada

Canada produces 71% of the entire world’s maple syrup, so it’s no surprise they’ve turned this sugary syrup into their very own sweet treat. Maple taffy is very much like the taffy we’re accustomed to here in the United States, but the way it’s made is part of what makes it such a fun candy — it’s the perfect treat for a snow day.

Canada produces 71% of the entire world’s maple syrup, so it’s no surprise they’ve turned this sugary syrup into their very own sweet treat.

When you have fresh powder outside, gather some of the clean snow and pack it into a pie plate or roasting pan. Then, bring maple syrup to a boil, until it reaches 235 degrees. Then, take it off the heat and immediately drizzle it over the packed snow — making lines with the syrup in the snow. Let it cool, then pick it up — either with your fingers or a popsicle stick. If you can catch that first bite while part of the syrup is still warm, you’ll never forget it.

2. Carambar Caramels — France

If you combined Tootsie Rolls, Sugar Daddy candies and Laffy Taffy wrappers, you’d get the French caramel sticks known as Carambar Caramels. These soft, chewy candies are recognized for their long shape and the fun, cheesy jokes printed on the inside of their wrappers.

These candies must take cheesy jokes to another level, as the jokes on these candy wrappers are so terrible that the French sometimes call bad jokes “Carambar Jokes.” Perhaps they could take some pointers from the authors of the jokes on the Laffy Taffy wrappers — we have to admit, we enjoy that cheesy humor.

3. Brigadeiros — Brazil

Brigadeiros are a favorite candy in Brazil with a connection to women’s voting rights. Similar to what we know as a chocolate truffle, these dense chocolate fudge balls were created by the wife of Brigadier Eduardo Gomes, a candidate for president in 1945 — the first year women could vote in Brazil.

Similar to what we know as a chocolate truffle, these dense chocolate fudge balls were created by the wife of Brigadier Eduardo Gomes, a candidate for president in 1945 — the first year women could vote in Brazil.

Made with condensed milk, cream, butter and cocoa powder, it’s no wonder these are one of the favorite candies from around the world. After the chocolate balls are finished, they’re often rolled in chocolate sprinkles, or garnished with other sweet toppings, such a milk powder, Nutella or fruits. Gomes’s wife served these delectable treats at fundraising events for her husband. At the end of the campaign, even though he lost, Brigadeiros are still a favorite for Brazilians to indulge in during celebrations to this day.

4. Shokolad Para Pitzputzim — Israel

Elite is Israel’s top-selling candy brand, so there are quite a few favorites that come from this particular line of candy. The Shokolad Para Pitzputzim, or popping milk chocolate bar, gets a lot of buzz. Imagine implanting your favorite flavor of Pop Rocks into a Hershey’s milk chocolate bar — that’s what Elite has done in this unique candy bar creation. It’s the ideal candy around the world for a chocoholic who also loves the popping sensation. We get why it’s so popular in Israel — it’s certainly a sweet sensation.

5. Prince Polo — Poland

We’d love to tell you this popular chocolate treat began with a story of a prince, but sadly, it’s since been discovered there was never a Prince Polo. Instead, these top-selling, chocolate-covered crisp wafers originated in the 1950s, during the early years of the Polish People’s Republic.

Think of it as a Kit Kat® with a few more layers. You’ll find four layers of extra crispy wafers and three layers of chocolate filling all covered in rich, dark chocolate. Fun fact: At one point in time, Prince Polos were one of the few chocolate bars available in the country of Iceland. It’s also a top seller there.

6. Turkish Delight — Turkey

Of all the candies from around the world, Turkish Delight is the most ingrained in national identity. Yes, there are candies recognized for being a part of particular cultures, but many know the story of Turkish Delight. Here’s what you need to know. “Turkish Delight” was the name given to the treat by an English traveler who couldn’t pronounce the Arabic name “rahat-ul hulkum,” and it ended up becoming a common nickname.

“Turkish Delight” was the name given to the treat by an English traveler who couldn’t pronounce the Arabic name “rahat-ul hulkum,” and it ended up becoming a common nickname.

The candies are small cubes of sugary gel that kind of look like Jello. It can be used to bind nuts and fruits — and nowadays, they even cover some of them in chocolate. It’s so good that it’s the candy responsible for making Edward gluttonous in “The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe.”

7. Kinder Surprise — Germany

This next candy is a contender for the best candy from around the world — and it’s illegal in the United States. What kind of candy could possible so good — or bad — that it’s banned in our country? The Kinder Surprise is a milk chocolate shell with a milky white lining in the shape of an egg. Seems innocent enough, right? The inside is hollow, leaving room for a toy — that’s right, a toy comes with every single Kinder egg — hence the name Kinder Surprise.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has deemed the toy a “public health risk, as the consumer may unknowingly choke on the object.” Therefore, there are no Kinder Surprises for children in the United States — but that doesn’t stop them from making our list of best candies from other countries.

8. Cadbury Chocolate Fish — New Zealand

There are several manufacturers of chocolate fish, but the favorite is none other than Cadbury. In New Zealand, the people love this candy so much, they’ve adopted it as part of a common phrase. For example, it’s common to hear Kiwis say, “Give that kid a chocolate fish,” if they want to recognize a child for doing something well.

These candies are somewhere between five and eight centimeters long and made with either white or pink marshmallow, then covered in milk chocolate. They even put the freshly covered fish under a blower to create ripples in the milk chocolate that mimic scales. What a treat!

9. Palm Sugar Candy — Cambodia

Eating palm sugar candy is said to be a religious experience — if you’re lucky enough to get your hands on it. The palm sugar tree is found in Cambodia and considered sacred. The sole ingredient in this candy is the hardened sap from the palm sugar tree. Therefore, if you’re eating a part of this sacred tree, you’re eating holy candy.

Eating palm sugar candy is said to be a religious experience — if you’re lucky enough to get your hands on it. The palm sugar tree is found in Cambodia and considered sacred. The sole ingredient in this candy is the hardened sap from the palm sugar tree.

Where can you find it? If you want the real authentic palm sugar candy, you’ll want to stop at a roadside stand in Cambodia. There are no preservatives in palm sugar candy, so it doesn’t last long. If you can’t make it to the streets of Cambodia, you can purchase variations online in shrink wrap, but we’re not so sure that sweet treat is as pure.

10. Meiji Apollo Strawberry Chocolates — Japan

Shaped like an umbrella with the scent of chocolate covered strawberries, these candies are the favorite of many in Japan. The small candies have a dark chocolate, brown bottom with a pink strawberry top. In every bite, you get the perfect mix of fruit and rich chocolate. Think of them as chocolate covered strawberries to go, without the mess. They’re small, but that just means more of them can fit in the box.

The best part? When you open a fresh box of Meiji Apollo Strawberry Chocolates, you can smell the sweet strawberries from a mile away.

11. Cherry Ripe — Australia

Older doesn’t always necessarily mean better, but in the case of Australia’s Cadbury Cherry Ripe, it does. This classic has been around since the early 1900s — MacRobertson’s gets credit with creating this piece of candy that was a favorite then and remains a favorite today. What is it about this candy bar that keeps Australians coming back for more? The center is made with ripe cherries and coconut, and the entire mixture is then covered in dark chocolate. To us, it sounds like a Mounds bar with a fruity twist.

12. Marianne — Finland

Marianne candies are mints filled with either chocolate or toffee. While it may not be easy to envision your mints with chocolate or toffee at their core, remember that mint and chocolate make a great pair. We’re just used to seeing the mint on the inside — these candies have reversed the trend. The mix of mint and toffee intrigues us, as many claim it is both refreshing and satisfying at the same time — sounds like a winning combination.

Marianne candies are mints filled with either chocolate or toffee. While it may not be easy to envision your mints with chocolate or toffee at their core, remember that mint and chocolate make a great pair.

The candy itself represents a combination that’s worth noting — that of the Russian and French cultures. While the Russians were known for their confectionery tradition, the French were known for their mint.

13. Mozartkugel — Austria

Yes, the Mozartkugel and Mozart, the composer, do have something in common — their birthplace. The composer came first, but flash forward about 100 years, and this candy was born in the same place: Salzburg.

A confectioner began by forming small bars of marzipan, coating them in praline cream and then putting them onto little sticks. However, he didn’t stop there — he then dipped them in bittersweet chocolate, of course. This completed the recipe for the Mozartkugel, which some claim is just as good as the composer.

These candies are a popular gift, often taken as a souvenir from Austria since they have become a synonym for the Austrian culture. Who doesn’t want to be remembered by a piece of candy?

14. Thai Tamarind Candy — Thailand

Chances are, when you try tamarind you’re either going to love it or hate it — the feelings about this candy are almost as strong as the flavors in it. Let’s start with the basics. The basis for the candy comes from a tamarind tree, which produces fruit in little pods. It’s sweet, tart and sometimes very sour, or even spicy — a tiny bit of this stuff gives you a lot of flavors. Vines and seeds can also end up in the candies occasionally, which gives the haters even more to complain about.

While the flavors we described may remind you of a Warhead, we’re sure this probably packs even more of a punch than that. We’ll agree with the majority and say this one is probably an acquired taste.

15. Stroopwafels — Netherlands

You may have expected anything waffle-related would come from Belgium, but that’s not the case. This waffle-like wafer cookie treat comes from the Netherlands, and it brings a flavor profile that makes us melt. With roots all the way back to the 1800s, stroopwafels began as a way to eliminate leftovers. A baker gathered leftover breadcrumbs and combined them with syrup to make the very first treat.

You may have expected anything waffle-related would come from Belgium, but that’s not the case. This waffle-like wafer cookie treat comes from the Netherlands, and it brings a flavor profile that makes us melt.

Today, they’re made with a batter, just like waffles, but a stiffer version. Then, they’re cut in half, and a caramel filling is added to glue two pieces together. As if they don’t sound delicious enough on their own, they’re meant to be eaten with a hot cup of tea or coffee. Just set the stroopwafel on top of your cup, and you’ll get the center softened just enough to give you an even tastier treat!

16. Dairy Milk — United Kingdom

Cadbury’s Daily Milk is a simple, classic, traditional milk chocolate bar. It has been a best seller in the United Kingdom for what seems like forever. It was first introduced in 1905 and became the company’s best-selling product just nine short years later. While it has competition from a few other brands, it continues to remain the top-selling candy. As far as we’re concerned, people wouldn’t buy them if they didn’t like them.

You can find Cadbury products here in the United States, as Cadbury and Hershey worked out a deal, so the chocolate could be made and sold here. However, while the taste may be close to Cadbury, we’re confident you should indulge in one across the pond to get the full, authentic effect. Besides, Cadbury’s purple wrappers were initially chosen as a tribute to Queen Victoria, so it only seems appropriate.

17. Cote d’Or Brut — Belgium

Continuing with the chocolate theme and heading to Belgium, you’ll find Cote d’Or chocolate — a company that is always among the top Belgian chocolate companies. Among their selection of chocolates is Brut, a type of chocolate that comes in a few different options — all of which have rave reviews. The choices include milk chocolate with hazelnut and caramelized almonds, milk chocolate with blueberries and dark chocolate with caramelized pecans and cranberries.

You may be wondering, what’s the big deal? We’re used to seeing chocolate with nuts and fruit. True, but you aren’t used to enjoying these combinations with one of the top Belgian chocolate companies — no offense, Hershey.

18. Peppermint Crisp — South Africa

In the warm climate of South Africa, it makes sense that one of the favorite candies from this country is peppermint crisp, something refreshing and cool. Nestle South Africa is behind this chocolate bar, which is merely a coating of milk chocolate with a crunchy peppermint filling. Imagine a York peppermint patty, but instead of soft and chewy, you have a crisp crunch. That’s what you can expect from a peppermint crisp.

In the warm climate of South Africa, it makes sense that one of the favorite candies from this country is peppermint crisp, something refreshing and cool.

19. Haw Flakes — China

We have the Chinese hawthorn fruit to thank for these tangy, dark pink candies. Haws are red fruits that have a taste described as both tangy and sweet. These flavors carry over into the candy, which reminds us of the flavor profile of Sour Patch Kids.

These candies come in small, thin disc shapes stacked in tubes. You can’t miss these on the shelf — the packaging resembles that of Chinese fireworks. They have a firm consistency, but once you pop them in your mouth and begin chewing, they soften right up. Rumor has it these are banned in the United States by the FDA because they contain illegal or undeclared colors.

20. Palitos de la Selva — Argentina

These chewy candies are known as “jungle sticks” because of the different animals and animal facts on their wrappers. Aside from the fun facts on their packaging, these fruit chews are like a longer, skinnier version of Frooties.

The flavors are mixed, so each one of these jungle sticks has a combination of two flavors. The original flavor combination of strawberry and vanilla is still the most popular. The candy has a line right down the middle dividing the two sections of the candy.

21. Saft Goldbären — Germany

Saft Goldbären are German gummy bears by Haribo. They are among the most flavorful candies in the world.

These German gummy bears by Haribo are among the most flavorful candies in the world. It may seem silly to include something as simple as gummy bears on our list, but the German version is slightly different in taste from what you find in the United States. Saft Goldbären translates to “juicy gold bears,” and is due to fruit juice being added for an extra flavor boost.

Have a Sweet Tooth?

After reading about these sweets from different countries, we can’t help but crave some of our favorite candies. If you’re feeling the same way, check out our selection of candy at Candy Central. On our website, we offer smarter, easier ordering with an extensive variety of everyday, novelty, retro candy and more.

We love our candy so much, we’ve invested in temperature-controlled storage and delivery. If you want candy, we'll make sure you get it when, where and how you want it!

We have an efficient pick-and-pack operation, as well as fast, reliable shipping. We love our candy so much, we’ve invested in temperature-controlled storage and delivery. Order online today and get fresh candy shipped to you directly!